Clipdown rigs on the cheap

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Rod B
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Clipdown rigs on the cheap

Post by Rod B » Sat Oct 15, 2005 10:52 am

This is a pic of one of my early trys at a clipdown sinker. It has evolved a bit since this but I will have to take some more pics of later versions.
Simply it involves using a drilled plastic golf tee and a piece of plastic tube. On current 'models' I now use a rubber disc, as the plastic tube tended to stretch and not provide reliable friction.
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The tail wire on my early trys is ordinary galvanised fence wire and the 'blob' on the wire is 60/40 solder, just to keep the clip in place. I am now using TIG stainless steel welding rods, cut to size. The fence wire would rust over time, but non ever broke ( I seemed to loose them before that happened ). The eye for the clip was also soldered closed for extra security.
The main thing is that it releases everytime and so far has proved to be totally reliable. The main expense is the golf tees and they were around $3? for 25, from sports Amart. I have since found cheaper ones in Kmart.

I will get some pics taken and add to this over the weekend.

Also with this post I am trying a free image hosting service to store the images. More on that later if anyone is intrested .
Rod.

John Softly
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Post by John Softly » Sat Oct 15, 2005 1:56 pm

The new forum has gone straight to the sharp end of surfcasting and to someone who casts a ball sinker on an Alvey it may all seem like rocket science. The initial threads on the board are to do with distance in the surf and to get distance the baited hook has to be clipped down so that it flies out in the slipstream of the sinker. Clipping down is easy - getting it to unclip on impact is the problem. In general terms the hook either has to be forced from the clip or enough slack is created on the snood to allow it to drop off.
In Rods example, on impact the golf tee moves up the sinker tail, the clip falls out releasing the baited hook
Another DIY method utilises a stainless steel clip and a small piece if rubber tube placed on the sinker tail.

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Prior to casting the baited hook is placed in the clip and the clip pushed down towards the sinker as far as it will go. Cast! On impact the clip will be pushed up the tail allowing enough slack in the snood for the hook to drop out. Actually air pressure during the cast may prematurely push the clip up but the pressure of air on the baited hook will keep it in the clip until impact.
Cheers
John
Last edited by John Softly on Thu Oct 27, 2005 9:13 am, edited 4 times in total.

Rod B
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Post by Rod B » Sat Oct 15, 2005 9:44 pm

To further sharpen the end, here is a bit more on my efforts with clipdown sinkers/rigs. All the rig bodies are tied with 60 or 80lb mono. The snoods are lighter mono, depending on the fish being targeted. The snood does not have to be as strong as the leader as it has no bearing in the strength of the rig at the time of casting. UNLESS you are using a pulley rig.

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These were some of my first efforts. The metal clip idea did not last long as it was too fiddly to get the solder blob in place. The drilled golf tee was/is my solution, and it has been an ongoing method. The tail on the sinker below left, is made using TIG s/s welding rod.

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Above, this is the current state of the idea. A rubber disc cut from an old gum boot is the part that keeps the tee in the down position untill the rig hits the water, when water pressure pushes it up, releasing the hook. The idea works well but requires accurate snood lengths as the distance the tee can move is limited by the length of the tail wire on the sinker. My current solution to this problem is as below.

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As a variation I have built the release on to the leader, still using a golf tee and a rubber disc (6mm diameter). I do not fit anything to stop the movement of the tee so it can move from down near the sinker up to the paternoster.
In this pic the distance the tee can travel is 50cm. I find this eliminates the need for accurate snood tying. It also allows for easy changes in snood length, if that seems like a good idea. In use the rubber disc would be pushed down to the tee to keep the hook clipped in place.



These last 2 images are just to give more detail of the top and bottom of the rig. Actual lengths can be a matter of individual choice or based on whatever 'recipe' you might use.

The 'paternoster' is just a dropper loop, stiffened with the plastic tube from a 'cotton bud'. BUT with a swivel incorporated into the initial loop, before tying the knot. It's a bit fiddly at first but not too hard to do.
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Rod.

Ian Cameron
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Post by Ian Cameron » Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:02 pm

Hi Rod,
is the rubber disc strong enough to stop a bulky flesh bait from forcing itself back up the sinker leader and thus losing the slipstream effect of the sinker?

If your your retainer hook had a turned up/down eye the bait would lay straight more easily. How would another rubber washer between the hooks go to keep the bait stretched out and more streamlined for better presentation?

Rod B
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Post by Rod B » Mon Oct 17, 2005 9:06 pm

Hi Ian, The rubber disc does not move until the rig hits the water. It is surprisingly tight on the line. I just stick a needle through the rubber, and cut the line at a steep angle to give it a start when threading the bits together.

The smaller hook has the line wound round it a few times to keep the bait up the hook, so as to keep the main hook point clear. The actual position depends on the size of the bait. I think the origin of the idea came from a Cod rig in a UK magazine. I find it works well with cut Bonito.

The only time so far it was found wanting is when I tried to cast a Bonito head on an 8/0 hook. [The clipped hook in the pic is a 4/0] The rig came unclipped, but I did bag a 1.2mtr Wobbegong so I was not too disappointed.
I have made up a variation, as yet untried, with an extension wire attached to the tee to give a bigger hook to hold the larger size hooks during the cast.
Rod.

Rod B
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Post by Rod B » Sun May 14, 2006 12:53 pm

Further to my earlier post and prompted by Kens question here's an update on the method I am using to clipdown rigs. I was having trouble keeping a bigger bait/hook clipped while casting using Breakaway impact shields. This is where my project has evolved to at present.

The pics with the blue golf tee are currently in use, the version with the pink tee is going to be tested next time on the beach. The line it is threaded on is Penn 10x Leader, 80lb 0.80mmdia. The tee is totally free sliding so experience says it will (should) work.

I dont limit how much the tee can slide, so it is able to move from near the sinker tail up to whatever means is used to attach the snood.
When I check after reeling in the rubber stopper is always up against the snood attachment.

The wire extension is 30-40mm long, below the tee, and you can see how I fixed it to the tee in the second pic. In the last one I have tried a different method, similar to how the bristles are fixed in a wire brush. The wire is single strand leader wire. There was way too much fiddling around to attach wire in the second pic, hence looking for an easier method.

When using bigger baits I find bending the end of the wire back towards the line, improves the holding power and does not affect release when hitting the water.

It also does work with ganged rigs.
Rod.

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