Circle Hooks for Surf Fishing

Discuss surfcasting and and all other things related to surf fishing here.

Moderator: John Softly

Post Reply
kenmare
Angler
Angler
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Gosford NSW Australia

Circle Hooks for Surf Fishing

Post by kenmare » Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:36 pm

I've just been reading about circle hooks, which seem very popular in the US with surf casters fishing for striped bass.

Has anyone used them?

The attraction in the US appears to be to allow catch and release with minimal damage to the fish.

But I also understand a fish essentially hooks itself when picking up and running with a bait. Seems a big advantage when a rod is set in a holder.

I plan to give circle hooks a try with an impact shield, using pilchards as bait.

Can anyone offer any tips on baiting and rigging?

Regards,

Bob

Roy Watson
Angler
Angler
Posts: 37
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2004 7:48 pm
Location: Brisbane

Circle Hooks

Post by Roy Watson » Sun Nov 12, 2006 2:57 pm

Hi,

I have used circle hooks on a clipped-down pennel rig with bonito strips for bait, but found that I got bitten off too many times. I then tried plastic tubing between the two hooks, but still found that I was getting bitten off. Still looking for a better solution (than ganged hooks).
Roy Watson

kenmare
Angler
Angler
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Gosford NSW Australia

Post by kenmare » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:57 pm

Hi Roy,

You would attribute the bite-offs to tailor?

I understand, from what I've read on the Web, that US beach fisherman also use circle hooks for bluefish which are of course like our tailor, except they grow much bigger.

When blue fish are around, the US fishos use heavy (100 lb plus) hard mono leaders to avoid being bitten off. They also mostly use large single hooks -- 5/0 and up -- with large fish chunks, pinned once to leave the point well exposed so the hook can work properly.

Of course, the design of a true circle hook is such that a fish is never hooked deep in the gut, but always in the lip or side of its mouth as it swims away.

So, in most cases, the leader should not come in contact with the fish's teeth anyway, once the fish is hooked.

Regards,

Bob
Last edited by kenmare on Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Jeremy Schrader
Serious Angler
Serious Angler
Posts: 973
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2003 9:40 pm
Location: Melbourne

Post by Jeremy Schrader » Sun Nov 12, 2006 10:50 pm

Another option with the circles and Tailor os to use the knottable wire that is available.

This will stop the bite offs but still allow the use of the circles.

Regards :D

cyberfish
Keen Angler
Keen Angler
Posts: 211
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2003 11:05 am
Location: South Coast NSW

Post by cyberfish » Mon Nov 13, 2006 12:25 pm

In order to work the circle hook has to go all the way into a fishes mouth then as it is dragged back out of the mouth and over the teeth of the fish the circle hook grabs the jaw. So definately no good for tailor as the line has to run over the teeth. If you don't want to use wire a long shank hook with the bait hooked once only and allowed to hang naturally with a short trace that allows you to strike quickly before the tailor can swallow the bait might work (sometimes).

fish33
Angler
Angler
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:05 pm
Location: Sydney

Post by fish33 » Tue Nov 14, 2006 5:09 pm

I have been having a go with circle hooks, the worked well on salmon when the rods where put in holders. As mentioned the hook needs to go all the way into the mouth, if your holding the rod resist the temptation to strike, let the fish hook itself. Havnt been trying them for long and only hooked up about a dozen salom on circles, still making my mind up about them but I like them so far.
Gary

nigelr
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 7:21 am

Post by nigelr » Wed Jan 23, 2008 6:48 pm

I use circle hooks both from the rocks and in the surf, I am very happy with the hook up rate.
However, I use gang hooks exclusively for tailor, whether using pilchards or strip baits.
When fishing the surf at night for mulloway, if I'm getting bitten off or more likely, not hooking up, I switch to gangies and bingo, in come the tailor!
In the above situation, I am snelling 2 Demon circles on 80lb mono, so mainly I'm missing the hook-up rather than getting bitten off.
I find gangies suit the way tailor attack the bait far better than circles.
Cheers.

Sandgroper
Angler
Angler
Posts: 119
Joined: Sat Aug 07, 2004 6:59 pm
Location: Perth, WA

Gangies

Post by Sandgroper » Fri Feb 08, 2008 12:47 am

A good 'D'vice' to try for taylor fishing can be seen on the 'Tournament Casting Forum' posted by Jeremy on Feb 4th.

As for hooks, the circle variety are excellent. I tend towards the 'Owner' Mutu type as they seem to work well for me. Have a look at: http://www.ownerhooks.com/pages/product ... ehooks.htm

When Taylor fishing, one simply must use wire of some description, or at least a gang of hooks arranged so that their teeth do not meet the line.

I use what is referred to in WA as a 'Trig Rig', based after a prominent fishing location in the metropolitan area. It utilises 4 Mustard 7766D hooks and I prefer to gang them with a size 6 or 7 swivel between the hooks. On an average size pilchard, the hook size's ganged starting at the bottom go: 1/0 - 2/0 - 4/0 - 3/0. When you lay this alongside the pilchard you will see that it approximates the size/shape of the bait.

The 'chopper' taylor feeds by snapping the tail from a baitfish, then returning to feed on the disable fish. When I put the fish on the hooks I cut the tail off. 1. It lets the juices out. 2. It presents the bait like its already been attacked. 3. It casts a damm site better.

I would estimate that 85% + of hook ups are on the second from bottom hook with fish in the 1-2 Kg range. Bigger fish = different story.

Good luck.

Sandgroper

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest