1974 pendulum

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dooboy129
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1974 pendulum

Post by dooboy129 » Wed Feb 08, 2006 1:17 pm

further to my post re 1974 world champs, if i can work it ill scan in dick lewers (modern fishing) description of the jap. pendulum cast.
Casting

Japan's three gold medals were captured by the diminutive Chiaki Motegi who shared with Steve Rajeff the rather unique experience of earning at least one gold, one silver, and one bronze medal - a coveted treble. His style with a surf rod was similar to that of his fellow countrymen, and rather unusual if you'll forgive an understatement.
Having taken up a position at the casting box, they would turn about so they faced the opposite direction to their target With a leader drop of about 2.5 metres (8' - 9'), the cast would be started by swinging the plug pendulum fashion from out in front to beneath and to the left of the rod just forward of the reel.
This brought the plug, on the in-swing close to their left side. When the to- and fro-ing was adjudged just right, the direction of the final in-swing was changed to bring the plug close to their right side and, as it reached this position, they would move into the cast, pivoting 180 degrees to send the plug hurtling down the V court. If following this description is hard, you ought to try their casting method! Chiaki's style varied slightly from the above. Though he commenced with the pendulum swing. he slowly worked it into a circular swing horizontal to the ground with the rod tip the centre of the circle. As the plug, on one of its journeys around the circumference of this circle, passed under his rod, he would move into the cast, the additional momentum gained by the circular travel of the plug supposedly giving that extra distance.
MODERN FISHING - DECEMBER 1974.
I think, but wouldnt bet on it, that ive read that an english guy, doing work for ABU sweden, developed the pendulum cast while testing a new rod abu was designing in 1974 However, if these japs used their pendulum in 1974, they must have developed it at least a couple of years earlier.interesting eh?
fishing yair

soap
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Post by soap » Wed Feb 08, 2006 5:39 pm

Yes very interesting and having seen a "Japanese pendulum cast" it has similar characteristics to the current world champs style. In other places I have spoken about the similarities between the tournament casting and some Karate moves, perhaps the relationship is proven by the Japanese them self’s, I'm talking about a 260+m cast by a fella that looked to be around 70 kilos, the current world champ is a power lifter and is probably 170 kilos.
Check it out



http://www.surfcaster.de/Media/Themen/M ... eskops.mp4

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Post by John Softly » Wed Feb 08, 2006 8:55 pm

Peter Bagnall was the English guy who was responsible for the Abu Atlantic 484 and what, in 1969, was called the 'Zoom' cast. The 484 was sent to Peter as a prototype salmon rod and was based on an American, party boat, Conolon blank. It had a duralumin butt, a metal ferule, hard chrome rings and the reel seat was placed 27 inches from the butt.
Pior to Peter's Zoom cast - state of the art was the Hardy Long bow, reverse taper, rod used with the layback cast invented by Leslie Moncrieff. Anglers who shelled out £22-19-6 for a 484 found that the layback style didn't work with the new rod and leaflets were distributed by Abu explaning the Zoom cast. I think Tight Lines of 1973 had full Zoom cast instructions in. Peter Bagnall's 1969 cast was 180 yards and he later improved that to 194 yards. Nigel Forrest was the first 200 yarder but that was with a true pendulum cast.
There were others involved in the pendulum style in the early days. Dennis Darkin was one and a guy with the sirname of Brown (can't remember his christian name) was another.
Whether the Japanese were the first pendulum casters I have no idea but I was always under the impression that the pendlum evolved from the OTG or South Afican cast. Andy Miller would be the guy to ask.
The Hi Inertia evolved in Brighton, the Backcast in Norfolk and the OTG in South Africa (there are interesting stories as to how and why each one evolved) but Peter Bagnall's Zoom cast was only part of the pendulum story.
Cheers
John

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Post by p_thain » Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:26 pm

george brown, john :wink:

speaking to peter bagnall a few years ago he told me the 484 was a heavy 10ft salmon spinning rod, he chopped bits off here and there and added a dural butt to make the first rod and that was subsequently developed into the 484

the 1973 tight lines has a picture sequence of nigel forrest executing the pendulum cast and somewhere i have a two page article/advertisement from angling times showing the zoom cast and advanced zoom cast which was a form of pendulum, this was very early 70's or maybe late 60's

the OTG evolved in the USA in the late 1920's and the information about that cast got to south africa either through the book "saltwater fishing tackle" or by someone who either travelled to the USA from south africa or from south africa to the USA.

peter bagnall has his own website www.peterbagnall.co.uk not a lot about casting as its well over 30 years since he cast competitively but a nice website with some very good photographs

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Post by John Softly » Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:29 am

G'day Peter,
Thanks for your input on this one - I know that you have an interest in the history of the sport.
I can see by the sequence photo's in Harland Major's book that the OTG cast was pretty well advanced by the late 30's - and there is no doubt that Primo Levenais was the best ever.
My copy of SWFT is the '48 edition and on the pages preceeding the Primo sequence shots there are sequence photo's of Cranage Tilton who seems to be casting an aerialised cast and the pages prior to that are labeled 'Pendulum cast' although there is little or no body rotation and the action is a relaxed side swipe.
The really interesting period are the years 1967 to 1975. My copies of Tight Lines from 1975 onwards are pristine but prior to that thay are in dissaray due to having been refered to so many times. Once the pages are divorced from the cover there is no telling what years issue they belong to.
I have a loose page which I think belongs to 1974 and I also think that was the last year the 484 (and the Nigel Forrest designed 464) appeared in Tight Lines. The blurb says that 'The 484's record currently stands at 229 metres' Is there any record of who made that cast or was that just advertising blurb? A UKSF sanctioned cast of 250 yards wasn't made until Neil Mackellow made the quantum leap and cast 271 in 1983.
Can you throw any light on Abu's claim?
Cheers
John

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Post by p_thain » Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:42 am

the 229m cast was peter bagnall, it was made in spain with 6lb mono which would have probably been around .28mm?

peter went over there to cast in one of the spanish events and they cast unrestricted in those days so peter spooled a 6000 up with some 6lb mono and proceeded to completely destroy them despite the fact the spanish were on 2lb mainline and fixed spools!

i also have that story tucked away in the archives thanks to peter himself who kindly loaned me his scrap book so i could photocopy it.

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Post by John Softly » Fri Feb 10, 2006 8:30 am

Peter,
Thank you. Your concept of casting history is only surpassed by your ability to cast record distances.
Documentation is so important. If it weren't for Harland Major would we know about the exploits of Primo Levenais? The little snipets such as the information about Peter Bagnalls Spanish cast are very important in the overall picture of casting evolution and history.
Cheers
John

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Post by Ian Cameron » Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:13 pm

Ted Whittam threw 754'4" ( 229.9 m ) at the 1974 Aust titles in the 2-4oz light line ( 2-4lb mono + leader ) OTG with a sportex. Jack Grant threw 4oz levelline over 600ft - the magic 200yds - in the 60s OTG with a 'grizzly' , predecessor to the Fenwicks I think, and we were not able to match that again here til I got a purglas castmaster in 1979 with a plastic spool penn 100 .

Unfortunately being an insular bunch we missed out on the rod advances made by zziplex etc until recently.

Reg Tisdell from Taree Oz won the 2oz levelline at the Scarborough world champs in I think 1974.

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Post by p_thain » Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:23 pm

ian, i would love to see a bit of history on casting in australia, we know absolutely nothing about what went on in your country in the past.

i have an article on the 1974 world championships which mentions reg tisdell winning the 2oz leveline, i'll see if i can find it. if reg is still around i'm sure he would appreciate a copy :wink:

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Post by cyberfish » Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:30 pm

See what you've started dooboy 129! Thanks for the interesting posts guys and any old articles on Oz casting would be priceless! Andrew

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Post by Ian Cameron » Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:26 am

Peter, I can hopefully remember most of what went on in the surf and plug casting back to when I started in around 1970. I'll try and get what prior info to that I can for you If you have any specific or general queries - fire away. I just checked and Reg is very unwell these days, am trying to find a contact for him.

We have always had 2 seperate organizations holding surf comps. The casting Ass. which had best of 3 casts in each event, mostly 2+4oz levelline and various leader events. The fishing clubs Ass was levelline only with 2 casts in each event and both added together for scoring so don't make ANY mistakes. Both Ass. also had an accuracy event and % of winning scores in all events added together gave the overall winner in both Ass.

More if you want it. Ian

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